News & Events

Christmas Vintage Fair 2020

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Badan Warisan Malaysia is pleased to present A Vintage Christmas Fair 2020!  

If you are a collector or an avid fan of heritage items, please view our collection of preloved furniture from a Colonial House, exquisite crystals and collectables. Available now for sale.

All items are on an “as is where is” basis and will be sold on a first come, first served basis.

If you would like to view or buy any items in person, please make an appointment either via email to admin@badanwarisan.org.my or call Syuhada at 03-2144 9273 .

Please note that our office is open only on Tuesday – Thursday, between 10am – 5pm during MCO.

We accept cheques, cash and credit cards at the office, where a receipt will be issued. Online payments can be made to Badan Warisan Malaysia at:

Account Number : 0140 1111 8256
Bank Name : Maybank
Email : admin@badanwarisan.org.my

A booking confirmation will be sent after we receive proof of payment via email.

Collection of items is at our Heritage Centre at No. 2 Jalan Stonor, Kuala Lumpur. Delivery of items is available at an additional cost. 

RESTORING STADIUM MERDEKA – FOR THE RECORD

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Restoring Stadium Merdeka - For the Record

Organized by Badan Warisan Malaysia in collaboration with Think City Institute.

Webinar Details

Date: Saturday, 12 December 2020
Time: 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM (inclusive of Q&A)
Moderator: Lim Wei-Ling, President, Badan Warisan Malaysia
Free Admission

ABOUT THE TALK

Professor Ar. Laurence Loh shares with us the inside story behind the highly successful restoration of Stadium Merdeka. It is a story worth telling as it embodies the personal agendas and missions of key personalities in Badan Warisan Malaysia and describes the conversations that led up to the execution of the project.

What went on behind the scenes to set the stage for one of Malaysia’s most important conservation projects undertaken to date? 

How did Badan Warisan Malaysia, through Laurence’s technical leadership, craft the conservation approach to ensure it attained the Award of Excellence in the 2008 UNESCO Asia-Pacific Heritage Awards cycle?

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Professor Ar. Laurence Loh, AA Dip, APAM, MIID, ICOMOS, FHKICON, graduated from the Architectural Association School of Architecture in 1974 and returned to Penang in the same year to start his professional career. Laurence is a self-taught architectural conservation pioneer who has dedicated a large portion of his professional life and time to putting Penang and Malaysia on the World Heritage map through his high-profile architectural conservation projects, both theoretical and physical. The restoration of the Cheong Fatt Tze Mansion (1995 PAM Award of Excellence in Conservation and 2000 UNESCO Most Excellent Award) kickstarted his involvement in the field. In 2019, PAM bestowed upon him the PAM Gold Medal Award for Design Excellence.

As an architect, he has consistently produced best practice exemplars that set benchmarks for the cultural profession to emulate and he continues to push the boundaries to match universal expectations. His major architectural achievements, of which some are modern works, are iconic milestones that have directly and indirectly catalyzed change and influenced the architectural conservation process, design and policy locally, nationally and internationally.

Please click the button below to register.

Fraser’s Hill Resort and Spa Plan

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BWM MEDIA STATEMENT 

3 August 2020

Badan Warisan Malaysia (BWM), the leading national heritage NGO in Malaysia that was established in 1983, is saddened to learn of the recent destruction of important heritage buildings in Fraser’s Hill, which has resulted in the loss of priceless history and architectural heritage.

BWM is deeply concerned about the unnecessary destruction of the country’s built heritage. BWM Council is issuing this statement to disagree with this act of built heritage demolition.

As a body, we are actively working to try to preserve the country’s heritage for future generations. We are therefore disappointed to hear that these important aspects of architectural significance have been demolished without any due consideration.

Fraser’s Hill celebrated the centenary of its establishment as a hill station in 2019. Its unique location in the forested highlands of Peninsular Malaysia and limited access has allowed Fraser’s to preserve its distinctive historical, architectural and natural heritage. Unchecked over-development would jeopardise these qualities that have made it attractive to both local and foreign visitors for a hundred years.

Built heritage and intangible heritage values should be considered by the state administration, when evaluating tourism resources. It is vital that the state authorities control future development to maintain the existing rural scale, and not impose urban highrise scale, which will destroy the very charm of Fraser’s Hill which attracts tourists from far and wide.

Although we acknowledge that these are privately owned properties, it is indeed a shame that an opportunity was lost to document the architectural features of these iconic building through measured surveys. As far as we are aware, architectural salvage and archiving was not done before the demolition, for preservation and reuse.

On a separate note, BWM applauds and appreciates the recognition and the strong initiatives recently undertaken by DBKL to help boost tourism in the Federal Capital through the recognition of 353 locations and buildings as historical sites under the Jejak Warisan project in Kuala Lumpur.

We hope these type of government initiatives will be far-reaching and extend to cover more states in Malaysia to protect our heritage for the country’s future generations. What is lost is gone forever.

A petition under Change.Org has garnered 5,000 signatures thus far: https://www.change.org/p/ikhasas-group-call-for-review-of-fraser-s-hill-resort-spa?recruiter=55227218&utm_source=share_petition&utm_campaign=psf_combo_share_abi&utm_medium=whatsapp&recruited_by_id=42444930-c401-0130-8cf2-3c764e0455b2&utm_content=washarecopy_23585133_en-GB%3A0

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About Badan Warisan Malaysia

Badan Warisan Malaysia (The Heritage of Malaysia Trust) is the leading national heritage NGO established in 1983 as an independent registered charity. BWM works to raise awareness of heritage issues and advocate for a conservation-friendly environment in Malaysia. BWM works throughout Malaysia, cooperating with community groups, institutions, the private sector and all levels of Government to promote the conservation and preservation of our historic buildings and places. BWM plays a pivotal role in advocacy through a range of activities including heritage education, and we initiate research and documentation of our heritage assets and contribute to debates at international, national and local levels, on the quality of our built environment.

For more information on BWM, please visit badanwarisan.org.my

Media statement in BM is available HERE

Private Movie Screening: Garden of the Evening Mists

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FINAL POSTER

We are pleased to announce our collaboration with Astro Shaw and Golden Screen Cinemas, with gratitude for their generous sponsorship and support for an exclusive private screening and presentation of “The Garden of Evening Mists” at the newly opened luxury Aurum Theatre at The Gardens Mall, Kuala Lumpur.

There will only be 80 First Class Seats available; seats are available to BWM members by a minimum donation of RM850 per seat; and a minimum donation of RM1,000 per seat for non-members – which includes a 1 year membership at BWM. All donations to BWM for this event are fully tax exempt.

Kindly RSVP by 12 March 2020. Tickets are available upon confirmation of payment on a first come, first served basis. To book your ticket and for payment of your donation, please complete the attached form and return it to the BWM office either by hardcopy or by email to membership@badanwarisan.org.my.

Please download the Ticket Form and Event Program HERE


UPDATE AS OF 17 MARCH 2020

Please be informed that Badan Warisan Malaysia’s fundraising event, a private screening of the movie, “The Garden of Evening Mists”, sponsored by Astro Shaw and Golden Screen Cinemas, has been postponed from its initial date of 24 March 2020. This is due to the health and safety concerns from COVID-19 and in line with our government’s directives on Restricted Movement Order.

Once a new date is rescheduled for this event, we will inform and update you on the details.

We sincerely regret any inconveniences caused and would like to thank you for your kind understanding and continued support.

Welcoming New Council Members

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Badan Warisan Malaysia held its 36th AGM on 14 December 2019.

Here’s the line-up of our new council!

President: Esme Lim Wei-Ling
Deputy President: Dato’ Zahim Albakri
Honorary Secretary: Lim Ee Lin
Honorary Treasurer: Dato’ Zaha Rina Zahari

Council Members
Anand Krishnan
Tpr. Dr. Faizah Ahmad
Ar. Lim Take Bane
Caesar Loong
Omar bin Malek Ali Merican
YM Raja Nazeem Iskandar
Suridah Jalaluddin
YM Tengku Nasariah Tengku Syed Ibrahim

Honorary Council Members
Afzal Azhari
Prof. Dr. Ong Puay Liu

Congratulations and welcome aboard!

We would also like to thank our past President, Elizabeth Cardosa, and the rest of our previous Council Members who have retired; Deputy President – Ar. Dr. Helena Aman Hashim, Honorary Treasurer – Ishak Ariffin, Council Members – Maganjeet Kaur, Justine Chew, and Honorary Council Members – Lee Jia-Ping and Johan Abdul Razak for their support and contribution to the organization, particularly in their efforts to promote heritage conservation.

Stay in touch to get to know our newly elected Council Members!

Members’ Trip to Seri Menanti and Paroi, Negeri Sembilan

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Badan Warisan Malaysia
Members’ Trip to Seri Menanti and Paroi, Negeri Sembilan
Saturday 9 March 2019

Meet/Registration at Istana Lama Seri Menanti, 9.15 a.m.

Seri Menanti, the royal capital of the state of Negeri Sembilan, was established in 1773 as a loose confederation of luak (districts), by immigrants coming over from Sumatra (mainly Minangkabau). Of the original 9 districts (Sungei Ujong, Rembau, Jelebu, Jelai, Naning, Klang, Segamat and Ulu Pahang), hence its name, Negeri Sembilan, only the former five districts remain as part of the State today.

This visit is limited to a maximum of 40 pax, and will include a guided tour of the restoration of the Istana Lama as well as a talk and visit to some traditional houses in the area. After lunch, we will proceed to see the former Salinger House which has been relocated to a private estate near Seremban.

Registration fee for the trip is RM60/pax for members and RM85/pax for non-members. The fee is inclusive of lunch and some light refreshments.

The detailed programme will be provided to those who register for the trip.

Download registration form HERE and submit it to membership@badanwarisan.org.my

Multidisciplinary Approach in Heritage Conservation, Case Study: Langkawi UNESCO Global Geopark By UKM Governance and Education for Heritage Conservation Research Group

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register

 

ABOUT THE SHARING SESSION

This sharing session will present the work carried out by UKM’s Governance and Education for Heritage Conservation Research Group on Langkawi Geopark (GAMAT). Langkawi Island, which was the first UNESCO Global Geopark in Malaysia as well as in Southeast Asia, can be a model for integrated heritage conservation and sustainable development. As a nature-based tourism destination, Langkawi Geopark has a huge responsibility to conserve its natural heritage (both geological and biological) as well as its cultural heritage. From their respective perspectives and specialisations, the GAMAT team will offers insights into some of the issues and challenges pertaining to Langkawi Geopark as a model for integrated heritage conservation and sustainable development. With the tagline ‘making the past present for the future’, this team sought to highlight the significance of heritage conservation which carries the spirit of Semangat Kawi by underlying the symbiotic relationship between heritage (of the past), current development (of the present) and the needs of the next generations (for the future).

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

The GAMAT team comprises academics and researchers from different academic disciplines and includes Prof. Dr. Rahimah Abdul Aziz, Datin Paduka Dr. Halimaton Saadiah Hashim, Prof. Dr. Ong Puay Liu, Associate Professor Dr. Sarah Aziz, Associate Professor Dr. Geraldine K.L. Chan, Dr. Tanot Unjah, Dr. Lee Jing, Dr. Sharina Abdul Halim

LET’S TALK HERITAGE: A case for consensus-building and conflict-resolution for heritage place management

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The recent demolition of a traditional Malay house in Kampung Tanjung Kelab Pantai, Terengganu, which was reported as standing in the way of the RM4.5 billion Kuala Terengganu City Centre project, has raised yet again concerns amongst many heritage professionals over the status of protection of the nation’s heritage.

In this past year, we have been privy to other controversies involving the loss of cultural heritage places – some through demolition such as that of Ampang Park Shopping Complex and the row of houses, commonly known as “Serani Row” in KL; others through development or major changes in the “look” of the place, as in the painting of the staircase leading up to the Batu Caves Temple complex.

So how do we really understand what is heritage?

The ways in which heritage is often framed today is through such regimes as the World Heritage Convention, and our own National Heritage Act 2005. In many countries, Malaysia included, heritage processes are legalistic, using adversarial court systems to determine the heritage significance of a place and to determine what are acceptable and appropriate actions to safeguard heritage.

Conflict arises when there is disagreement between involved parties who are responding to real or perceived threats to their interests, values, identities or rights; fears that one’s heritage is disrespected create highly charged emotions.

This lack of agreement will impede or prevent mutual understanding while ignoring the conflict in the hope it will dissipate over time is also ineffective. Conflicts present major barriers to achieving good heritage outcomes for all parties.

Fundamentally, heritage is a complex concept, engaging feelings and identities of the many different peoples and groups which make up our society. It connects what is culturally important to us – the individual, the family, any specific cultural group, up to the larger social framework we refer to as nation. There can be no one singular view of what is heritage; rather there are multiple perspectives reflecting the multiple values of multiple stakeholders.

These stakeholders each have distinct roles and different interests. They are also likely to have very different concepts of what comprises heritage. This in turn oftentimes results in conflict or differences of opinion.

So how does one determine the heritage significance of a place, and the appropriate action to be taken? Should a place be protected under law, or changes (including demolition), be allowed? How do we seek co-existence of these multiple values?

The heritage professional is one whose expertise places them in a position to present an independent, objective view, advocating for a particular position. But there are occasions when this position is challenged by another “expert” view, resulting in disagreement on the “facts” and adding to an already confused situation.

Those of us working to promote and protect our national heritage should be advocating for a consensus-building methodology, focusing on the core needs and concerns of all parties, centered on fundamental values and identities, and ultimately negotiating for an outcome which adjudicates between economic, social, environmental and political perspectives.

Almost all the time, conflict arises because heritage places are located within contested terrain – e.g. old two-storey shophouses in the city centre where the local development plans allow for much higher plot ratios, a bungalow on a relatively large piece of land which has been identified for high-rise redevelopment, etc. etc.

We have to break this head to head pitting of economic and utilitarian benefits against that of heritage conservation. We have to create a framework based on recognizing difference and one which helps build respect for all values and connections and to seek consensus.

Had there been any attempts for conflict-resolution, which may have prevented, or at the very least mitigated against, the very distressing and wasteful outcome of the demolition of this property in Kuala Terengganu?

We do not have any direct knowledge of the context which led to the traditional timber house being knocked down. We do know from having seen a video of the demolition that in a matter of minutes, all vestiges of a traditional village lifestyle was cancelled out.

Was it that the owner refused to move because he wanted more compensation, with the reported value of RM20,000 not a fitting sum while RM2 million would have made up for the loss of his family’s history and legacy? Was it that the officially (government) recognized owner of the land, felt vindicated because it was their legal right to get vacant possession of the land? The conflict over this contested site is reported to have been going on for at least a year, if not two. Everyone else in the kampong vacated their houses. Was this the last bastion, holding out and fighting for heritage rights?

Following our inaugural Lensa Warisan lecture & discussion of 14 November, Badan Warisan is planning to hold a forum early next year to discuss issues relating to the management of heritage sites and the principles we should be using to guide our heritage practices. More details later.

Elizabeth Cardosa
President of Badan Warisan Malaysia