Latest Event Updates

Senses in Space: The Power of Memories in the Built Environment by Afzal Azhari

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Lensa 6 _ En Afzal Azhari

Admission for lectures: RM30 (RM20 for Badan Warisan members)
A packed lunch will be provided
Limited to 35 participants.
To register, email us at lensa@badanwarisan.org.my

Negeri Sembilan – Pentadbiran dan Adat Kini

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Adat Perpatih was brought to the Malay Peninsula by the Minang society from Sumatera who retained their customs when they migrated in the 14th century.  This traditional custom which is passed down orally covers a whole range of aspects of social life including the appointment of Yamtuan and Undang, punishment for breach of custom, marriage and regulations governing marriage, inheritance and other matters. In Peninsular Malaysia, the Adat Perpatih is practised only in Negeri Sembilan, Naning in Malacca and by descendants of the Minangkabau people in Kampung Lukut, Kota Tinggi, Johor. Nevertheless, the Adat Perpatih which is practised here today has adapted with the practice and custom of the indigenous people, who are the original inhabitant of the state, who practice local customs.

En. Mohd Khairil in his talk will discuss the Perpatih Adat administration system in Negeri Sembilan and its place in today’s administration.

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A native of Negeri Sembilan, En. Mohd Khairil Hisham Mohd Ashaari is a Curator at the Tuanku Ja’afar Royal Gallery, in Negeri Sembilan and a freelance translator. He is a graduate of Universiti Putra Malaysia in Agriculture Science and has a deep interest in Malaysian history. His research covers the customs, culture and heritage of Negeri Sembilan,the Negeri Sembilan Royal Institution, and history of the Bugis in Negeri Sembilan. Amongst his writings are Polemik Sejarah Negeri Sembilan -Tiada Kesudahan, Bugis di Linggi, Negeri Sembilan (Jurnal KALAM) and Hubungan Bugis dan Minangkabau (Jurnal KALAM). 

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Adat Perpatih telah dibawa ke Semenanjung Tanah Melayu oleh masyarakat Minang dari Sumatera yang telah mengekalkan adat resam mereka apabila berhijrah pada kurun ke-14. Adat tradisi yang diturunkan secara lisan ini, merangkumi secara menyeluruh pelbagai aspek kehidupan masyarakat termasuk pelantikan Yamtuan dan Undang, hukuman perlanggaran adat, peraturan nikah dan kahwin, pewarisan dan sebagainya. Di Semenanjung Malaysia, Adat Perpatih hanya diamalkan di Negeri Sembilan, Naning di Melaka dan penduduk berketurunan Minangkabau di Kampung Lukut, di Kota Tinggi, Johor. Walau bagaimanapun, Adat  Perpatih yang dipraktikkan hari telah mengalami penyesuaian dengan amalan dan adat Orang Asli yang merupakan penduduk asal negeri, yang mengamalkan adat tempatan.

En. Mohd Khairil akan membincangkan tentang sistem pentadbiran Adat Perpatih di Negeri Sembilan dan kedudukannya dalam pentadbiran masa kini.

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Seorang anak jati Negeri Sembilan, En. Mohd Khairil Hisham Mohd Ashaari merupakan Kurator di Galeri Diraja Tuanku Ja’afar, Negeri Sembilan dan penterjemah bebas. Beliau adalah graduan dari Universiti Putra Malaysia, dalam bidang Agriculture Science, dan mempunyai minat  yang mendalam dalam sejarah Malaysia. Kajian beliau meliputi adat, budaya dan warisan Negeri Sembilan, institusi Diraja Negeri Sembilan, dan sejarah Bugis di Negeri Sembilan. Antara penulisan beliau adalah Polemik Sejarah Negeri Sembilan -Tiada Kesudahan, Bugis di Linggi, Negeri Sembilan (Jurnal KALAM)  dan Hubungan Bugis dan Minangkabau (Jurnal KALAM).

The Value of Placemaking by Lee Jia Ping

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LENSA - Jia Ping

Admission for lectures: RM30 (RM20 for Badan Warisan members)
A packed lunch will be provided
Limited to 35 participants.
To register, email us at lensa@badanwarisan.org.my

The Wet Plate Collodion: A Demonstration of a Historical Photographic Process by Dr. K. Azril Ismail

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Banner 4 March

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ABOUT THE TALK

The talk will discuss the historical photographic process before the era of manufactured photographic celluloid films and gelatin silver prints as practised by early pioneers such as Sachtler & Co, Carter & Co, Kleingrothe, Henry Schuren, G.A. Schleesselmann, the famous G.R. Lambert & Co., and various other Europeans who opened studios in Singapore and Penang where they carried out work in Kedah, Malacca, and Borneo. The extraordinary images of “Old Malaya”, which we often regard with a sense of nostalgia, romanticised (or colonialised, depending on one’s political perspective) various aspects of our people and places through this visual representation.

In this talk, Dr. Azril will look at how these extraordinary images were made – from the clear glass coated with a thin layer of collodion salt solution, then immersed in a silver bath solution rendering it light sensitive, to exposing and developing it in-situ, either as a negative, or a positive (ambrotype).

In addition, Dr. Azril will do a brief demonstration replicating this process using an antique camera and an adapted mobile darkroom, with similar chemicals used in the 19th century process, to develop the plate on the spot.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dr. K. Azril Ismail is currently the Head of the Postgraduate Research & Development Programme for the Institute of Creative Arts & Design in UCSI, Kuala Lumpur. He holds a Doctorate in Philosophy from the University of Plymouth, for his visual studies of the Pudu Jail’s Graffiti (this portfolio is now on display at Badan Warisan Malaysia until 30 March 2019), having also graduated from UiTM (MA, Art & Design), and Columbus College of Art & Design, Ohio (BFA in Media Studies). An accomplished practising photographer and academic, Dr. Azril’s work has been featured in international exhibitions and published widely in art & photography magazines and journals

Members’ Trip to Seri Menanti and Paroi, Negeri Sembilan

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Badan Warisan Malaysia
Members’ Trip to Seri Menanti and Paroi, Negeri Sembilan
Saturday 9 March 2019

Meet/Registration at Istana Lama Seri Menanti, 9.15 a.m.

Seri Menanti, the royal capital of the state of Negeri Sembilan, was established in 1773 as a loose confederation of luak (districts), by immigrants coming over from Sumatra (mainly Minangkabau). Of the original 9 districts (Sungei Ujong, Rembau, Jelebu, Jelai, Naning, Klang, Segamat and Ulu Pahang), hence its name, Negeri Sembilan, only the former five districts remain as part of the State today.

This visit is limited to a maximum of 40 pax, and will include a guided tour of the restoration of the Istana Lama as well as a talk and visit to some traditional houses in the area. After lunch, we will proceed to see the former Salinger House which has been relocated to a private estate near Seremban.

Registration fee for the trip is RM60/pax for members and RM85/pax for non-members. The fee is inclusive of lunch and some light refreshments.

The detailed programme will be provided to those who register for the trip.

Download registration form HERE and submit it to membership@badanwarisan.org.my

Let’s Talk Heritage: Preserving Place Names for their Cultural and Historical Contexts; Kampung Kerinchi – A Case in Point

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The print and social media was all abuzz following the proclamation ceremony on 19 January 2019, when the urban settlement of Kampung Kerinchi which started in 1870s was declared to return to its original name, thus shedding its ‘up-market’ alias of “Bangsar South”, which nevertheless remains the name of one of the developments in the area.

Badan Warisan heartily welcomes this move; we believe it is high time Malaysians are more cognisant of the cultural, historical and communal contributions that have made Kuala Lumpur what it is as usually expressed in the original name of a place. We also advocate for the authorities responsible for the naming of areas and roads to take a stronger stand against approving names (and especially name changes) to support the gentrification rationale to ameliorate against the “inferior” connotation of the term “kampung”.

The coordination of geographical naming activities in this country is undertaken by the Malaysian National Committee on Geographical Names (MNCGN), which was established in 2002. At the state level, State Committees on Geographical Names (SCGN) are established to coordinate and implement the guidelines and procedures formulated by MNCGN. For the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, the state committee is chaired by the Secretary General of the Federal Territories Ministry and its members comprise representatives from various government agencies, regulatory and enforcement bodies, including Kuala Lumpur City Hall, as well as private organisations and non-governmental organisations.  This committee decides on the naming of areas, streets, including for new developments in Kuala Lumpur, and where a name is proposed by the developer, the committee takes into consideration the rationale for the name.

Kampung Kerinchi was formerly perceived as a squatter area and over the years much of the land here was bought over by developers, who branded their new developments with names of the more well-heeled neighbourhoods such as Bangsar (and in other areas, Damansara, Kiara, etc.) to widen their attraction.

The names of places do not exist in a vacuum; they have historic context and connections with ties to collective memories, sentiments, feelings and past. The naming of a place presents its identity and it reflects its roots and the communities who first settled in and developed the area. This significance is lost when names of places are changed.

Badan Warisan’s resources show that Kampung Kerinchi’s roots are closely linked to Kampung Abdullah Hukum.  Kampung Abdullah Hukum was opened by Indonesian pioneer Abdullah Hukum, who came to Kuala Lumpur in the mid-1850s from Kerinchi, West Sumatra. Abdullah led the Kerinchi community who had accompanied him here, and eventually settled on Bungsar Road (now Jalan Bangsar) in what had come to be known as Kampung Abdullah Hukum. As an aside, we hope that Kampung Abdullah Hukum does not get “lost” in the regeneration of the area and becomes only known as KL Eco City!

While Kuala Lumpur’s official boundaries up to 1924 included Kampung Abdullah Hukum, it was only enlarged in 1954 to include this area of Kampung Kerinchi. It is noteworthy that Kampung Kerinchi was identified in the Kuala Lumpur Structure Plan 2000 as an urban renewal or redevelopment area, but its redevelopment in fact goes back to the 1990s, a decade or more before the Bangsar South development started.

Read: Know about the KL’s Cultural, History contribution, urges expert – New Straits Times, 2 February 2019.

Listen also to: Kampung Kerinchi Makes Comeback: a BFM Interview with Elizabeth Cardosa, 22 January 2019. 
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