Month: April 2016

WORLD HERITAGE DAY #HERITAGE OF SPORTS

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It’s World Heritage Day! And this year’s theme is THE HERITAGE OF SPORT.

“Sport is part of every man and woman’s heritage and its absence can never be compensated for” – Pierre de Coubertin

Not only has sports united the country and the world towards a common goal, it has also brought in various forms of development such as the different installations and facilities respective to their practice, the development of art, architecture and techniques.

To celebrate World Heritage Day, Badan Warisan’s Council Member- Mr. Ishak Ariffin has written a piece on the Eton Fives Court- the only existing court of its kind here in Malaysia. 

1-Original etonfives court at Eton Chapel
Original Eton Fives Court at Eton Chapel

Eton Fives is a handball game played as doubles in a three-walled court. It is little known outside the circle of public schools in the England and elite universities, such as Oxford and Cambridge, as it has been primarily the preserve of their students and alumni. The origin of the word ‘fives’ is uncertain. It probably refers to the fingers, as in ‘a bunch of fives’.

 

The name has been used since the 17th century. There have been variations of handball games. Some form of fives was played by the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. The Irish, Americans and Basques have their own versions of fives. The English fives also has its variations, such as Warminster (or Wessex) Fives, Rugby Fives, Winchester Fives, Clifton Fives, St John’s Fives and Gissop’s Fives. A form of fives had also been played at Harrow in 1760s. It is a game that “anyone can play”. All you need is a ball and a pair of gloves to protect your hands.

Eton Fives originated from Eton College where it was first played against the chapel wall at the college. The first purposely-built Eton Fives court are the block of four Eton Fives courts along the Eton Wick Road, constructed in 1840 by the headmaster of Eton, Dr Hawtrey. The design of the courts was based on, but was not an exact replica of, the chapel court.

A.C. Ainger and some of his friends develop and published the ‘Rules of the Game of Fives as played at Eton’ in 1877. The object of the game is to force the other team to fail to hit the ball ‘up’ off the front wall before it bounce twice. The ball can bounce unpredictably as the three-walled Eton Fives court has ledges along it, a buttress on the left side and a step down towards the back. The first match between schools was on February 12, 1885, when Eton challenged Harrow. The first Oxford-Cambridge Varsity match took place in 1928. There are presently 55 sets of courts in England and Wales, totalling more than 1,700 courts.  Eton Fives has spread to Europe, built at Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz in Switzerland the 1920s and also Geneva, Zurich, Austria, Germany and France. Further afield, courts were built at Geelong Grammar School in Australia, at St Paul’s School, Darjeeling in India, and at the Malay College Kuala Kangsar (MCKK), Perak. There is a court in Buenos Aires, Argentina and the game is also flourishing in northern Nigeria and New Zealand.

Eton Fives in MCKK was introduced by its fourth Headmaster, C. Bazell. Bazell was an Oxford graduate (and possibly also an Eton alumnus?). Bazell joined MCKK in 1922 from Raffles Institution, Singapore and was appointed the Headmaster in 1923. The Eton Fives courts were built in 1928. Bazell also built the first swimming pool in MCKK in 1926 and the squash courts in 1938 (the second oldest in Malaysia).

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MCKK Team at Eton’s Chapel Court

 

The two Eton Fives courts at MCKK may not be the first fives courts to be built in Malaya (now Malaysia) but they are the only Eton Fives courts found in this region. The Straits Times reported on 30 April 1920 that when the Nighthawk scout plane was being assembled at the Padang Polo in Penang, not far from the Penang Hospital, “the fives courts are being converted into a hangar”. The former fives courts are now said to have been converted into a storeroom.

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Eton Fives revival game in 2014 at the Malay College Kuala Kangsar
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Eton Fives Court at MCKK before revival

Eton Fives was a very popular game in MCKK, along with rugby, cricket and football, until 1938 when squash was introduced. But the game was still regularly played until late 1960s. A few students continued playing the game sporadically through to the 1970s.Two representatives from Eton Fives Association (EFA), United Kingdom, visited in MCKK in 1994. The EFA Annual Report of 1994-95 recorded their visit. The visit came about after some old boys of MCKK initiated talks on reviving the game which culminated in an Eton Fives Revival ceremony on August 24th, 2014. Two EFA representatives were present to conduct a two-week coaching session for the boys and teachers of MCKK. The District Education Department also sent out invitation to other schools in Kuala Kangsar district to generate further interest in the game.

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Eton Fives Court after revival in 2014

In March 2015, MCKK entered two pairs of Eton Fives teams in the UK National Eton Fives Schools Championship in Eton College. Ironically, the MCKK senior pair was drawn against a pair of Eton College boys in their first game and won. Out of 51 pairs in the Under-15, the MCKK pair reached the Quarter Finals of the Cup, and among the 48 pairs in the Under-17, the senior MCKK pair went as far as the Plate Quarter Finals.

Eton Fives is experiencing a revival in the UK. The MCKK Eton Fives team’s performance in their maiden championship, after only six months being introduced to the game, sets the scene for a revival of the game in MCKK and Kuala Kangsar, if not in Malaysia. The 88 years old Eton Fives courts, the only one in Malaysia (and East Asia), is set to see a new life for many years to come after lying dormant for much of the last half century.

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Eton Fives Plaque at the Malay College Kuala Kangsar

This guest post is written by Ishak Ariffin. Ishak was trained in Town Planning at Cardiff University in Wales, UK. He is a registered Town Planner, Corporate member of the Malaysian Institute of Planners and the Royal Town Planning Institute, UK, as well as a registered EIA Subject Specialist. Ishak Ariffin is a long time member of Badan Warisan Malaysia and currently serves as the Honorary Treasurer for the trust. Ak mugshot-web

BWM PRESIDENT’S STATEMENT ON THE DISCOVERY OF THE GRAVESTONE PIQUES AT MASJID JAMEK

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The discovery of these old batu nisan in the vicinity of Masjid Jamek is incredibly exciting as it is clear, tangible and unarguable evidence of the historical timeline of the development of this city and its early Muslim settlement at the trading post which is now this modern metropolis. The fact that several other type of artefacts such as ceramic bowls, glass and other items have also been found makes it even more imperative that a proper and systematic methodology for detailed mapping of the ground below in the whole area surrounding the mosque be undertaken immediately, before the area is disturbed further. Publicly sharing all such recording and documentation by historians and archaeologists will provide a rich picture of the social and cultural lifestyle of these early settlers and ultimately help create a better understanding and appreciation of the many different people and communities which were the backbone on which this city was founded.

Whether the batu nisan were found is within or outside of the boundary of the gazetted National Heritage Site of Masjid Jamek, should not be an impediment because the National Heritage Act 2005 gives the Heritage Commissioner the authority to stop work if it is deemed that items of national heritage significance will lost or negatively affected by this work. The area where the batu nisan have been found is definitely within the larger historic enclave where the majority buildings have been gazetted on the National Heritage Register.

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Image taken from The Star

While completing a new water fountain feature within the River of Life project is clearly important to the aspirations of the city’s authorities, a comprehensive multi-disciplinary study of this site is even more important to the city and its citizens. In many parts of the world, showcasing historical and archaeological investigations at such urban sites provide a “crowd-pulling” platform for locals and visitors alike. Cordoning off this area will more than anything likely enhance the attraction of the site and its surrounds.

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Image of Gravestones Piques (Taken from The Star)

Badan Warisan Malaysia hopes that the National Heritage Department will step up to the mark and lead in this research to ensure that the heritage value of this site is given its due recognition.

DOCUMENTATION & RECORDING OF HERITAGE BUILDINGS

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This presentation aims to share the experiences and know-how of deploying new technological tools and techniques in measuring 3D geometrical properties or metric information of heritage buildings in a more complete, accurate and speedy way.

Emerging technologies like terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and digital photogrammetry will be discussed in the aspect of equipment, measurement accuracy, software solutions and implementation techniques. The session will also highlight how these technologies have revolutionised the visualization and accurate cum enduring documentation of heritage buildings.

The presentation will be demonstrated with real-life project execution methodologies and deliverables encompassing as-built drawings (façade, floor layout & section), point-cloud dataset, 3D mesh model, photo-realistic fly-thru and real-time 3D measurements in the virtual environment.

173Lai Jiun Shyong

Graduated with a bachelor degree in land surveying from University of Technology Malaysia (UTM), Lai Jiun Shyong devoted most of his career life to the field of GIS and software development. He is a registered land surveyor with the Land Surveyors Board Malaysia and currently working as the Senior Technology Officer with Jurukur Perunding Services Sdn. Bhd.

 

THIS KUL CITY: A CAPITAL IDEA! SHAPING KUALA LUMPUR

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Founded on the confluence of two rivers, modern Kuala Lumpur has survived floods, fires and uprisings to become one of South East Asia’s most vibrant cities.

In Shaping Kuala Lumpur, award-winning, internationally acknowledged and eminent architect and urban planner Dato’ Ar. Hajeedar Majid shares his experiences on how different events, policies and programmes have helped shape the development of Kuala Lumpur in its first two decades as Federal Territory.

Shaping Kuala Lumpur also features planner, Ahmad Jefri Clyde. He has over 40 years of experience in the field of urban planning and architectural design, and has lived and worked in Malaysia since 1981. Dato’ Ar. Hajeedar and Ahmad Jefri will discuss place making and urban planning and how Kuala Lumpur measures up to these tenets for a sustainable and inclusive city.

BIOGRAPHY OF SPEAKERS

Dato HajeedarDato’ Ar. Haji Hajeedar Abdul Majid

Dato’ Ar. Haji Hajeedar Abdul Majid, a graduate of Portsmouth Polytechnic, United Kingdom in 1972 in Architecture, started his architectural profession in Brighton, U.K before joining Urban Development Authority (UDA) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia as Architect and ending as Deputy Director.

Dato’ Ar. Hajeedar established his firm, Hajeedar and Associates Sdn. Bhd in 1978 in Kuala Lumpur, and has successfully tackled several challenging building projects from mosques, conservation of historical buildings, institutions and commercial projects.

Dato’ Hajeedar’s contributed to the inclusion of a conservation chapter in Kuala Lumpur 1st Structure Plan; his conservation and restoration works on Industrial Courts, Infokraf Centre, Kuala Lumpur Museum; conservation and re-adaptation work on Carcosa Seri Negara, commercial projects such as the high rise office buildings for Development Bank, MNI Twin Tower, Telekom Regional Office, PNB Service Apartments and the Tabung Haji Building in Ipoh. Religious projects include the Abu Bakar As –Siddiq mosque in Bangsar, the IIUM Mosque in the Gombak Campus; the SAAS mosque in Petaling Jaya, Putrajaya Musollas in Precinct 8 and 9 and Islamic Centre and National Mosque in Republic of Maldives.

Dato’ Ar. Hajeedar is an active member of the Institute of Malaysian Architects (PAM), he was President of PAM (1985-87), he was also involved in the initiative for Aga Khan Foundation For Islamic Architecture in 1980 and the Architect advisor to Kuala Lumpur City Hall for 11 years. For his conservation and restoration works, he was awarded the Penguin Prize by the Norwegian Government in 1985. He has been conferred Datukship from Selangor (2009) & Negeri Sembilan (2015) and received the PAM Gold Medal Award in 2012.

people_directors_03Ahmad Jefri Clyde

Ahmad Jefri Clyde received his Bachelor of Economics from the University of Queensland, Australia. He started his profession at the Department of Trade & Industry, Australia in 1972. His first stint in Malaysia was Daya Bina Akitek Sdn.Bhd. After 7 years, Ahmad joined Country Heights Sdn. Bhd as Technical Manager before becoming Principal for AJC Planning Consultants. He is currently Director for AJC Planning Consultants Sdn.Bhd since 2002.

Ahmad Jefri has received numerous awards for his contribution to town planning, such as the FIABCI Award for Residential Development in 1992, the FIABCI Award for Planning, Urban Redevelopment, Rehabilitation & Conservation in 2003, the Negeri Sembilan Town & Country Planning Award for Best Planned Neighbourhood and the MIP Award for Best Planned Housing Scheme for the Bukit Jelutong Township in Shah Alam.

He is currently a member of the Planning Institute of Australia and the Corporate Member of the Malaysian Institute of Planners. Ahmad Jefri also became a member of the Board of Town Planners in Malaysia in 2000.